Enabling Operational Excellence
Enabling Operational Excellence
Enabling Operational Excellence
Enabling Operational Excellence

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I’m afraid one of those people for whom this rule would just cause confusion … Are you?

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Ronald G. Ross

Ronald G. Ross

Ron Ross, Principal and Co-Founder of Business Rules Solutions, LLC, is internationally acknowledged as the “father of business rules.” Recognizing early on the importance of independently managed business rules for business operations and architecture, he has pioneered innovative techniques and standards since the mid-1980s. He wrote the industry’s first book on business rules in 1994.

Comments (4)

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    Kirk Fleming

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    I don’t find it confusing at all. It probably comes as a result of the confusion generated by the lack of any standardization or consistency in keypad interfaces. I’m guessing that so many people hit the ‘Enter’ button when prompted with a question requiring a “yes/no” response, the added direction was needed.

    I’d think we’d be rather okay with such instructions, given “Press Cancel for Credit” is considered normal–should anyone ever add a ‘Credit’ button to a keypad interface, expect to see improvised instructions such as “Press the orange ‘CREDIT’ button for Credit”.

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    b meacham

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    What is the problem with this one? It seems quite straightforward to me.

    • Ronald G. Ross

      Ronald G. Ross

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      I’m a bit surprised. I got a couple of comments like this. I guess it’s my knee-jerk reaction to redundantly expressing something twice(?) Concern for the illiterate or the color-challenged(?). I’m just saying. I would stand there a while wondering if I were missing something. Just me, I guess.

  • Avatar

    h p

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    Ok, I looked and immediately thought, what about the OTHER green button..for enter.. and had a puzzled moment wondering, is what they say really what I think it means…… I think if the “green” had been removed, it would have been a much better sign. A public library I recently visited had a sign on almost every wall, with messages of must not, ranging from telling patrons not to drag, rock or misuse the antique chairs, to “stay home if you are sick” to long instructions on who can use the public pcs, and for what, to how to replace books, or when not to. I thought, this is too much for people to process. The problem with bad rules is that people shut down and miss the important stuff.

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